Tips for Cleaning Leather Upholstery

Always keep leather furniture out of direct sunlight to prevent drying and cracking the leather.

To nourish the leather, mix one part white vinegar with two parts linseed oil, shake well, and apply to the leather using a soft cloth. Work in a circular motion, covering the entire surface. Rub in thoroughly, let it sit for about 10 minutes, then buff with a soft cloth to bring a shine to the leather surface. You may need to buff once more before sitting on the furniture.

Remove stains such as ink by dipping a cotton swab in rubbing alcohol and rubbing over the spot. Dry the area with a blow dryer. If the stain remains after drying, apply a thick coat of non-gel, non-oily cuticle remover. Leave on overnight, then wipe off with a damp cloth.

Remove dark stains from light-colored leather upholstery by mixing a paste of one part lemon juice with one part cream of tartar. Rub the paste on the stain and leave in place for about 10 minutes. Apply another layer of the paste, work it in, then remove with either a damp sponge or a damp sponge topped with moisturizing soap.

For general leather cleaning, use a moisturizing soap, such as Dove. Lather on with a soft cloth, and wash the item to remove dirt and grime. Do not overwet the leather and do not rinse after washing, just buff with a soft cloth; this allows the moisturizing soap to condition the leather. Polish as usual.

Remove road salt from leather shoes by mixing equal parts water and white vinegar. Dip a cloth in the mixture and wipe over the leather. This may have to be repeated several times to clean the surface. Buff and apply a paste shoe polish.

Some slipcovers can be laundered in the washing machine. Large slipcovers should be cleaned in a commercial machine, but always test for colorfastness before washing.

Tips for Cleaning Leather

Here are some homemade and inexpensive ways to protect and clean leather:

Leather should be kept out of direct sunlight.

Leather should be cleaned regularly. First, use a soft cloth or micro-fiber cloth to dust the surface. Saddle soap works beautifully on leather.

Another option for cleaning leather is to take a damp cloth, wipe it across moisturizing soap and lather the leather. Don’t rinse – buff for a nice shine.

Remember: When removing spots from leather, always test any cleaning method on an out-of-the-way spot first.

One tip for removing spots from leather is to dip a cotton swab into rubbing alcohol and rub the spot. This can work for removing ink spots as well. If this doesn’t work, you can use non-oily cuticle remover. (Note: That is cuticle remover, not nail-polish remover.) Leave it on overnight and wipe it off with a damp cloth.

To remove normal spots from leather:

1 part lemon juice
1 part cream of tartar

Simply work the paste into the spot with a soft cloth, and if soils remain after working it in, let it sit for a few hours. Come back and apply a little more paste, work it in and wipe clean.

Water spots can be removed from leather by moistening the area again with a little water, then letting it dry or gently blowing dry. Never place leather in the sun to dry.

To remove road salt from leather (could be on shoes, coat, etc.):

1 part water
1 part white vinegar

Take a cloth and dip into the solution, then blot over the shoes or coat lightly to remove the salt. This may have to be repeated several times to clean the entire surface. When you finish they should look almost like new. Be sure to wipe leather shoes with a damp cloth frequently, and keep them well polished with a paste.

To keep leather supple, use the following homemade recipe:

1 part white vinegar
2 parts linseed oil
jar with a lid

Pour the solution into a jar with a lid, shake well and apply to the leather with a soft cloth. Let it sit for 12 hours and buff. If the cloth starts to soil, be sure to change it often. Store the leftover solution for future usage.

Removing spots on suede is a whole different problem. For suede shoes, try an art gum eraser first and if that doesn’t do the trick, use undiluted white vinegar on a soft cloth, and be sure to blot – never rub when cleaning suede