How to Clean White Leather

Leather is a popular and durable material for shoes, furniture and purses. Even though leather is sturdy, it’s a porous surface that can absorb oils from skin and hands, causing stains. White leather is especially susceptible to stains. Here’s how to clean white leather.

Wipe leather regularly with a dry microfiber cloth to get rid of smudges and light soiling. For a deeper clean, use a commercial leather cleaner or make your own. Mix a solution of warm water, a few drops of Castile or liquid dish soap and a few drops of vinegar. Dampen a cloth with the solution and wipe down surfaces. Do not saturate the leather, as too much water will damage it. Use a second cloth dampened with clean water to wipe off the soap. Dry thoroughly. Another recipe for a homemade cleaner: Mix ½ cup olive oil with ¼ cup of vinegar in a spray bottle. Spritz on the stain, let sit for five minutes and wipe. Whatever you do, avoid bleach or ammonia-based cleaners as they can damage the leather.

Wipe up spills as soon as they happen to minimize the chance of staining. Even if you’re fast with the cleanup, stains will happen so you need to know how to clean white leather shoes, how to clean a white leather purse and how to clean a white leather sofa. Grab one of these items and get going.

How to Clean a Leather Jacket

Kristina Castagnola

Leather jackets put a shot of cool in your wardrobe. They’re expensive, though, and they can be expensive to clean since you can’t throw them in the washing machine with your jeans. You can clean your coat at home and keep it looking good without paying dry cleaner prices. Here’s how to clean a leather jacket.

Don’t use ammonia- or bleach-based cleaners to clean leather. They can damage the finish and cause the leather to get excessively dry or even crack. Don’t use too much water, either, as it can stain leather.

Clean spills on the leather jacket immediately with a soft cloth. Leather is porous and will absorb liquids, causing a stain to form. Leather can also scratch, so keep sharp objects away from it.

To clean leather, mix a solution of warm water and dish soap, dip a soft cloth into it, wring it out and wipe the jacket. You can also make a cleaning solution of one part vinegar to one part water. Use a second clean, damp cloth to wipe off the cleaning solution. Dry the jacket with a towel.

To remove stains from from your jacket, grab one of these items and get cleaning.

How to Clean Leather Shoes and Boots

Leather shoes. You have a closetful of boots, sneakers and pumps made of leather because it’s beautiful and durable. Knowing how to clean leather shoes and how to clean leather boots will keep your footwear looking good and preserve the leather for years. Here’s what you need to know.

Step 1: Remove the laces.
If they’re dirty, run them through the washing machine or replace them.

Step 2: Clean loose dirt and debris.
Use a soft cloth or a brush to remove any grime that may be stuck to the shoe’s leather surfaces.

Step 3: Apply soap.
Mix a solution of warm water and dish soap, dip a soft cloth into it, wring it out and wipe the exterior surfaces of the shoe.

Step 4: Wipe off soap.
Use a second clean, damp cloth to wipe off the soap. Dry with a towel. Warm, soapy water will also remove water stains and scuffs.

How to Clean a Leather Purse

Rubrica

A good leather purse is a fashion investment. Make yours last longer by learning how to clean a leather purse. You’ll keep your hobos, clutches and totes looking great for years.

The most important thing to know about how to clean leather: Don’t use ammonia- or bleach-based cleaners. They can damage the surface. Go easy on the water, too, as it can stain leather.

On to our lesson on how to clean a leather bag. Empty all the pockets and shake the purse upside down to remove dust and debris. Turn the lining inside out and clean using a lint roller. If you cannot pull out the purse lining, vacuum using the fabric brush attachment.

To clean the leather, mix a solution of warm water and dish soap, dip a soft cloth into it, wring it out and wipe the exterior surfaces of the purse. Use a second clean, damp cloth to wipe off the soap. Dry with a towel. Warm, soapy water will also remove water stains and scuffs.

Stains happen to your purse, even when you’re careful. To remove them, grab one of these items and get going.

How to Clean Leather Car Seats

Leather seats add a touch luxe to your car. They’re pricey, so you need to take care of them. Here’s how to clean leather car seats so that they look great and last a longtime.

First, vacuum the seats, being careful to remove dirt and debris from the crevices. Next, apply a cleaning solution to the seats. Do not use bleach or ammonia-based cleaners as they can damage the leather. You can use a commercial leather cleaner, or you can make your own. Mix warm water and Castile soap or liquid dish washing soap together in a bucket. Use a ratio of 5 parts water to 1 part soap. Dampen a cloth with the solution and wipe down the seat surfaces. Don’t saturate the leather because too much water could pool in the seat seams and seep into the cushions. Excess water can also stain the leather. Wipe clean with a second damp cloth. Dry thoroughly with a towel.

Another DIY idea to clean leather: Mix 1/2 cup olive oil with 1/4 cup of vinegar in a spray bottle. Spritz on the seat, let sit for five minutes and wipe.

The best way to clean leather car seats is to prevent stains. Wipe up spills as soon as they hit the seat. Even if you’re fast with the cleanup, stains will happen. Grab one of these items and get cleaning.

Tips for Cleaning Leather Upholstery

Always keep leather furniture out of direct sunlight to prevent drying and cracking the leather.

To nourish the leather, mix one part white vinegar with two parts linseed oil, shake well, and apply to the leather using a soft cloth. Work in a circular motion, covering the entire surface. Rub in thoroughly, let it sit for about 10 minutes, then buff with a soft cloth to bring a shine to the leather surface. You may need to buff once more before sitting on the furniture.

Remove stains such as ink by dipping a cotton swab in rubbing alcohol and rubbing over the spot. Dry the area with a blow dryer. If the stain remains after drying, apply a thick coat of non-gel, non-oily cuticle remover. Leave on overnight, then wipe off with a damp cloth.

Remove dark stains from light-colored leather upholstery by mixing a paste of one part lemon juice with one part cream of tartar. Rub the paste on the stain and leave in place for about 10 minutes. Apply another layer of the paste, work it in, then remove with either a damp sponge or a damp sponge topped with moisturizing soap.

For general leather cleaning, use a moisturizing soap, such as Dove. Lather on with a soft cloth, and wash the item to remove dirt and grime. Do not overwet the leather and do not rinse after washing, just buff with a soft cloth; this allows the moisturizing soap to condition the leather. Polish as usual.

Remove road salt from leather shoes by mixing equal parts water and white vinegar. Dip a cloth in the mixture and wipe over the leather. This may have to be repeated several times to clean the surface. Buff and apply a paste shoe polish.

Some slipcovers can be laundered in the washing machine. Large slipcovers should be cleaned in a commercial machine, but always test for colorfastness before washing.

Tips for Cleaning Leather

Here are some homemade and inexpensive ways to protect and clean leather:

Leather should be kept out of direct sunlight.

Leather should be cleaned regularly. First, use a soft cloth or micro-fiber cloth to dust the surface. Saddle soap works beautifully on leather.

Another option for cleaning leather is to take a damp cloth, wipe it across moisturizing soap and lather the leather. Don’t rinse – buff for a nice shine.

Remember: When removing spots from leather, always test any cleaning method on an out-of-the-way spot first.

One tip for removing spots from leather is to dip a cotton swab into rubbing alcohol and rub the spot. This can work for removing ink spots as well. If this doesn’t work, you can use non-oily cuticle remover. (Note: That is cuticle remover, not nail-polish remover.) Leave it on overnight and wipe it off with a damp cloth.

To remove normal spots from leather:

1 part lemon juice
1 part cream of tartar

Simply work the paste into the spot with a soft cloth, and if soils remain after working it in, let it sit for a few hours. Come back and apply a little more paste, work it in and wipe clean.

Water spots can be removed from leather by moistening the area again with a little water, then letting it dry or gently blowing dry. Never place leather in the sun to dry.

To remove road salt from leather (could be on shoes, coat, etc.):

1 part water
1 part white vinegar

Take a cloth and dip into the solution, then blot over the shoes or coat lightly to remove the salt. This may have to be repeated several times to clean the entire surface. When you finish they should look almost like new. Be sure to wipe leather shoes with a damp cloth frequently, and keep them well polished with a paste.

To keep leather supple, use the following homemade recipe:

1 part white vinegar
2 parts linseed oil
jar with a lid

Pour the solution into a jar with a lid, shake well and apply to the leather with a soft cloth. Let it sit for 12 hours and buff. If the cloth starts to soil, be sure to change it often. Store the leftover solution for future usage.

Removing spots on suede is a whole different problem. For suede shoes, try an art gum eraser first and if that doesn’t do the trick, use undiluted white vinegar on a soft cloth, and be sure to blot – never rub when cleaning suede